happiness essay: HAPPINESS: Essays on the Meaning of Life

HAPPINESS: Essays on the Meaning of Life

HAPPINESS: Essays on the Meaning of Life
List Price:


HAPPINESS: Essays on the Meaning of Life
List Price:
Your Price: – HAPPINESS: Essays on the Meaning of Life

Published in London in 1903. (149 pages) Translated by Francis Peabody in Cambridge, Mass. in 1902.
Carl Hilty was born in Switzerland on February 28, 1833. He was a student at Gottingen, Heidelberg, London, and Paris. In 1874 he was appointed Professor of Constitutional Law in the University of Bern. In 1890 he became a member of the Swiss House of Representatives, and in 1901, he was made Rector of the University of Bern. The authors follow-up book to this volume is entitled; “The Steps of Life: Further essays on Happiness.” This will be out soon for the Kindle Reader.

Excerpt:
…..modern realists say: “The world we see about us is one where only a few can succeed and where many must fail. There are not good things enough for all. The question is not whether such a state of things is right or just. On the contrary, it must be admitted to be a hard, unreasonable, unjust universe. It is not for the individual, however, set without consent of his own in such a universe, to change it. His only problem is to make certain that in such a universe he is ‘the hammer, not the anvil.'”
…..Again, one must not make pleasure an end, for pleasure comes of its own accord in the right way of life, and the simplest, cheapest, and the most inevitable pleasures are the best.
…..Again, one can bear all troubles, except two: worry and sin.
…..Further, all that is really excellent has a small beginning. The good does not show its best at once.
…..Finally, all paths which it is best to follow, are entered by open doors.
…..There have been periods in history when people, without the restlessness and fatigue that now prevail, accomplished far more in many forms of human activity than men achieve today. Where are we now to find a man like Luther, who could write his incomparable translation of the Bible in an incredibly brief space of time, and yet not break down at the end of the task, or be forced to spend months or years in recreation or vacation? Where are the scholars whose works fill thousands of volumes, or the artists like Michael Angelo and Raphael, who could be at once painters, architects, sculptors and poets? Where shall we find a man like Titan, who at ninety years of age could still do his work without the necessity of retiring each year to a summer resort or sanitarium? The fact is that the nervous haste of our day cannot be wholly explained by assuming that modern men do more work, or better work, than their predecessors. It must be possible to live, if not without perfect rest, still without haste, and yet accomplish something.

Contents:
I. The Art of Work —- II. How to Fight the Battles of Life —- III. Good Habits —- IV. The Children of this World are Wiser than the Children of Light —- V. The Art of Having Time —- VI. Happiness —- VII. The Meaning of Life

Published in London in 1903. (149 pages) Translated by Francis Peabody in Cambridge, Mass. in 1902.
Carl Hilty was born in Switzerland on February 28, 1833. He was a student at Gottingen, Heidelberg, London, and Paris. In 1874 he was appointed Professor of Constitutional Law in the University of Bern. In 1890 he became a member of the Swiss House of Representatives, and in 1901, he was made Rector of the University of Bern. The authors follow-up book to this volume is entitled; “The Steps of Life: Further essays on Happiness.” This will be out soon for the Kindle Reader.

Excerpt:
…..modern realists say: “The world we see about us is one where only a few can succeed and where many must fail. There are not good things enough for all. The question is not whether such a state of things is right or just. On the contrary, it must be admitted to be a hard, unreasonable, unjust universe. It is not for the individual, however, set without consent of his own in such a universe, to change it. His only problem is to make certain that in such a universe he is ‘the hammer, not the anvil.'”
…..Again, one must not make pleasure an end, for pleasure comes of its own accord in the right way of life, and the simplest, cheapest, and the most inevitable pleasures are the best.
…..Again, one can bear all troubles, except two: worry and sin.
…..Further, all that is really excellent has a small beginning. The good does not show its best at once.
…..Finally, all paths which it is best to follow, are entered by open doors.
…..There have been periods in history when people, without the restlessness and fatigue that now prevail, accomplished far more in many forms of human activity than men achieve today. Where are we now to find a man like Luther, who could write his incomparable translation of the Bible in an incredibly brief space of time, and yet not break down at the end of the task, or be forced to spend months or years in recreation or vacation? Where are the scholars whose works fill thousands of volumes, or the artists like Michael Angelo and Raphael, who could be at once painters, architects, sculptors and poets? Where shall we find a man like Titan, who at ninety years of age could still do his work without the necessity of retiring each year to a summer resort or sanitarium? The fact is that the nervous haste of our day cannot be wholly explained by assuming that modern men do more work, or better work, than their predecessors. It must be possible to live, if not without perfect rest, still without haste, and yet accomplish something.

Contents:
I. The Art of Work —- II. How to Fight the Battles of Life —- III. Good Habits —- IV. The Children of this World are Wiser than the Children of Light —- V. The Art of Having Time —- VI. Happiness —- VII. The Meaning of Life

Your Price: – HAPPINESS: Essays on the Meaning of Life

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