I’m Not Crazy, I’m Just Not You: The Real Meaning of the 16 Personality Types

I’m Not Crazy, I’m Just Not You: The Real Meaning of the 16 Personality Types

I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You: The Real Meaning of the 16 Personality Types

Tracing the growth of the study of personality type from its roots in the work of Carl Jung to today’s subtly nuanced type theory, I’m Not Crazy, I’m Just Not You shows how greatly our individual personality preferences affect our interactions with others. By shedding light on individual characteristics and tendencies, psychologists Roger R. Pearman and Sarah C. Albritton teach us how to overcome our natural inclination to judge difference in order to recognize and celebrate it.

This new

List Price: $ 19.95

Price: $ 9.70

This entry was posted in Happiness and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to I’m Not Crazy, I’m Just Not You: The Real Meaning of the 16 Personality Types

  1. Anonymous says:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Kind of Heavy, But Interesting, August 2, 2014
    By 
    BookWoman (Upstate N.Y.) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: I’m Not Crazy, I’m Just Not You: The Real Meaning of the 16 Personality Types (Paperback)
    This book is not a light overview of personality types. It is densely written and you will find it takes some time to delve into it. I haven’t finished the book yet, as I find it kind of heavy going. Not that it isn’t interesting, mind you. It’s just not for light “read a little before I go to sleep”-type reading. I love the title, I think I need the T-shirt.
    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. Ray says:
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    It’s textbook not a self-help book, January 14, 2012
    By 
    Ray

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    First – the kindle edition is horrible. It cuts off many of the charts/tables/graphs included in the book.

    Second – Although the book contains good information. It’s really written as a textbook. If you are trying to formally study the subject, then great; but if you are simply trying to get a little insight on different personality types etc… you should reconsider purchasing this book. Other authors have done a much better job of making this topic relatable. (See books by Marti Olsen Laney).

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. Amazon Customer says:
    25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paradoxically fluffy and profound, May 17, 2003
    By 
    Amazon Customer (Hayward, CA) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    I think this, aside from Keirsey’s, “Please Understand Me II,” is probably the most useful book I’ve found in understanding the overarching theory and subtheories of Jungian-Briggsian personality theory. This slim volume manages to convey a number of different sub-theories of how preferences interact, from the conflicts between the Perceiving and Judging functions, to temperament. Sometimes these models can seem to conflict with each other, however, this seems to flesh out the theory more than a simple one-perspective guide ever could.
    It does all of this in an oddly sketchy, yet very iNtuitive way: for each type, the profile is just a series of phrases that describe the dominant and auxiliary functions. And yet, these same sparse phrases manage to trigger lines of thought and association, that can lead to a larger understanding of just what each preference means, and how to understand their interaction in each of the sixteen types. I think, in fact, it is this exact lack of detail, that assists one in understanding personality typing in a more profound way, one that almost defies expression in words.
    There is some wonderful advice (quick, and to the point) on dealing with inferior function eruptions for each type, as well as symptoms of these grip experiences (if you’re interested in this aspect, supplement with Naomi Quenk’s wonderful book, “Was That Really Me?” for a more in-depth look at inferior functions), so that you can diagnose yourself quickly, and find ways to correct your imbalance. There are also some wonderful suggestions on how to communicate with other types, and show them the sort of respect they most appreciate receiving. And the authors find some wonderful real-life examples in illustrating the preferences, and how they express themselves in people (I’m particularly fond of the illustration of Sensing and iNtuition).
    What is unfortunate about this book is that the tone can become a bit heavy-handed, and a little too intellectually fluffy at the same time. Admonitions litter the 200 or so pages quite frequently, warning people that “personality type can be used to gain power unethically, so don’t do it!” I think, in some ways, this diminishes some of the power of this book in assisting you to understand Jung’s theory.
    However, I think this book serves as a wonderful iNtuitive guide to understanding the whole of personality typing, in ways that most other books can’t. Sometimes paradox and conflicting information can help you to understand theory far better than the a completely coherent presentation can. I don’t recommend this book for Sensing types looking to learn more, but for an iNtuitive, especially an NTP or NFP, this is probably one of the best out there!
    ~~INTP author~~
    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No