The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses

The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses

The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses

Choosing locally grown organic food is a sustainable living trend that’s taken hold throughout North America. Celebrated farming expert Eliot Coleman helped start this movement with The New Organic Grower published 20 years ago. He continues to lead the way, pushing the limits of the harvest season while working his world-renowned organic farm in Harborside, Maine. Now, with his long-awaited new book, The Winter Harvest Handbook, anyone can have access to his hard-won experience. Gardeners an

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3 Responses to The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses

  1. Richard L. Lachance "domaine" says:
    71 of 71 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Winter Harvest Handbook, May 9, 2009
    By 
    Richard L. Lachance “domaine” (Cocagne, NB Canada) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses (Paperback)
    Once again Elliot Coleman has provided us with a wealth of knowledge when it comes to both home and commercial gardening. In these times of change, it is reassuring to know that there are those who are more than willing to share what they have learned. We have been using some of his techniques here in New Brunswick, Canada with great success. We are currently eating spinach in April and May that we planted last fall in our cold frame. If a crop can survive one of our winters, they should survive elsewhere. If you want to put in a garden, this is a must book to own.

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  2. Kirsten says:
    178 of 182 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Good reading, not quite what I was looking for, May 6, 2011
    By 
    Kirsten

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses (Paperback)
    I agree with jyoung’s review that there are great stories and history lessons in the book of how winter gardening works and how it worked for the French & British in the 1800’s. The whole last 1/3rd of the book is about marketing and packaging produce for a business, so not very applicable for me as a home gardener. I also find his stories and techinques difficult to apply on a smaller scale for my home garden. I feel the book lacks actual how-to information, it is just some stories on what he has tried over the years and what he grows to sell to his customer base. Living at almost 11,000 feet in Colorado, I was really hoping for some good information on winter gardening since we have around 7-8 months of snow/year including receiving snow sometimes around (or after) July 4th. Though the book was an interesting read and a good history lesson, it was not quite the technical how-to guide I was looking for.

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  3. Lynette R. Fleming "Coauthor of Lunch Buddies... says:
    178 of 181 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Build Yourself A Winter Wonderfarm, April 27, 2009
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses (Paperback)
    Got a little land? Love a lot of vegetables? Then build yourself a Winter Wonderfarm. You may not be able to enjoy fresh garden tomatoes in the dead of winter, but there are more than 30 green and root vegetables that you can enjoy. From carrots to onions, celery to kohlrabi, and almost every vegetable in between, your Winter Wonderfarm will become the envy of your neighborhood. Perhaps that’s where the expression “green with envy” came from . . . a better, greener farm.

    The three components to a successful winter harvest, according to Mr. Coleman are:

    1) Cold-hardy vegetables
    2) Succession planting
    3) Protected cultivation

    As it turns out, if we can protect our vegetables from the winter winds, we can grow many vegetables successfully, even in the snow. Some vegetables, such as spinach, lettuce and matte, are actually even sweeter and more tender in cooler temperatures. Think you surely have to provide supplementary lighting? Nope . . . not needed when grown in one of Mr. Coleman’s “cold houses”. He uses these cold houses even in the Maine winters of Zone 5.

    You’ll also learn about vertical production of tomatoes and how to create your own cold frame with quick hoops made of electrical conduit and 10-foot-wide spun-bonded row cover held down by sandbags. These hoops can cover the same area as a 22 by 48 foot greenhouse at 5% of the cost. Speaking of cost, a recent article in the AARP Magazine indicated that we can save $1,000.00 a year growing our own vegetables in a small garden. Now add your winter crop savings, and imagine what you’d save. Your Winter Wonderfarm will yield delicious, organic vegetables, improving your diet and fattening your wallet. Forget putting out the Christmas lights . . . just grow vegetables.

    Lynette Fleming, Coauthor of Lunch Buddies: Buddy Up for a Better Diet

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