A really great gravy recipe for Thanksgiving?

Question by sciencehammer: A really great gravy recipe for Thanksgiving?
We have a huge family get-together every year for thanksgiving, and we go all out in the food department. The only exception is that the only gravy is the standard jar-o-blandness that you buy at any store in America. I did a google search, but I really can’t find a good recipe for homemade gravy. I’m looking for something really unique, perhaps with spices not normally associated with gravy. I’d love to be able to show up and offer an alternative to same old bland gravy.

Best answer:

Answer by Jef
This is the gravy I’ve been using for the past three years.

Rich Turkey Gravy

* Roasting pan with pan juices from a roast turkey (about 14 lb)
* Unsalted butter (less than 1 stick), melted, if turkey drippings yield less than 1/2 cup fat
* About 9 cups hot brown turkey stock
* 3/4 cup all-purpose flour

Preparation

Pour pan juices through a fine-mesh sieve into a 2-quart glass measure (do not clean roasting pan), then skim off fat and reserve. (If using a fat separator, pour pan juices through sieve into separator and let stand until fat rises to top, 1 to 2 minutes. Carefully pour pan juices from separator into a 2-quart measure, and reserve fat left in separator.) If there is less than 1/2 cup reserved fat, add melted butter.

Add enough turkey stock to pan juices to total 8 cups liquid (2 quarts). Straddle roasting pan across 2 burners, then add 1 cup of remaining stock and deglaze pan by boiling over high heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits, about 1 minute. Pour through fine-mesh sieve into glass measure with stock.

Whisk together reserved fat and flour in a 4-quart heavy saucepan and cook roux over moderately low heat, whisking, 5 minutes. Add hot stock with pan juices in a stream, whisking constantly to prevent lumps, then bring to a boil, whisking. Stir in any turkey juices accumulated on platter and simmer gravy 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.

Cooks’ note: Gravy can be thickened using cornstarch instead of a roux. Discard fat from pan juices. Cool 1 cup of stock (uncovered) or bring to room temperature. Stir the 1 cup stock into 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon cornstarch in a bowl until cornstarch is dissolved. Pour 8 cups stock with pan juices (see recipe, above) plus deglazed pan drippings into a 4-quart heavy saucepan and heat over high heat until hot. Stir cornstarch mixture, then add to hot stock in a stream, whisking constantly. Bring gravy to a boil, whisking constantly, then stir in any turkey juices from platter and boil gravy, whisking, 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.

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