Nice Thanksgiving Traditions In Canada photos

Check out these thanksgiving traditions in canada images:

Happy Thanksgiving
thanksgiving traditions in canada
Image by MSVG
Even Chanel the family dog is celebrating Thanksgiving with us!

For all of those celebrating Thanksgiving Day (a.k.a. Turkey Day) this weekend wish you a happy Thanksgiving!

For those of you who don’t celebrate it this weekend, have a great weekend also.

For Canadians it means it’s a long weekend! When do you have your turkey? Sunday or Monday?

"The history of Thanksgiving in Canada goes back to an explorer, Martin Frobisher, who had been trying to find a northern passage to the Pacific Ocean. Frobisher’s Thanksgiving was not for harvest but homecoming. He had safely returned from a search for the Northwest Passage, avoiding the later fate of Henry Hudson and Sir John Franklin. In the year 1578, he held a formal ceremony in Newfoundland to give thanks for surviving the long journey. French settlers who came to New France with explorer Samuel de Champlain in the early 1600s also took to celebrating their successful harvests. They even shared their food with the indigenous people of the area as well as setting up what became known as the "Order of Good Cheer." As many more settlers arrived in Canada, more celebrations of good harvest became common. New immigrants into the country, such as the Irish, Scottish, Germans would also add their own harvest traditions to the harvest celebrations. Most of the American aspects of Thanksgiving (such as the turkey) were incorporated when United Empire Loyalists began to flee from the United States during the American Revolution and settled in Canada.

Thanksgiving in Canada did not have a fixed date until the late 19th Century, when it was typically held on November 6th. After the end of World War I, Thanksgiving Day and Remembrance Day ceremonies were usually held during the same week. To avoid the two holidays from clashing with one another, in 1957 the Canadian Parliament proclaimed Thanksgiving to be observed on it’s present date……..Today, Thanksgiving is celebrated on……..the second Monday of October in Canada."

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving

Being Thankful
thanksgiving traditions in canada
Image by Flооd
Fellow Canadian Boy_Wonder chose Thanks Is For Giving as the theme today at We’re Here. It’s my family’s tradition to have the big meal on Sunday even though the actual holiday is on Monday. Allows for recovery time before going back to school and work.

So, this isn’t my daily self-portrait for today but it’s my contribution to the group theme. I’m of course thankful to live in Canada, that I have no struggle for food or shelter and that my family is healthy. I should remind myself of these things on the crappy days.

Happy Thanksgiving To All My Canadian Flickr Buddies
thanksgiving traditions in canada
Image by bill barber
Busy for a good deal of today. Will be around to visit later today and tomorrow .

From my set entitled “Twelve Mile Lake, 2008”
flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/sets/72157607787077684/
In my collection entitled “Places”
flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/72157600763089…
In my photostream
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, or Thanksgiving Day (Canadian French: Action de grâce), is an annual one-day holiday to give thanks for the things one has at the close of the harvest season. Some people thank God for this bounty. [1] The holiday is celebrated on the second Monday in October.

Thanksgiving is a statutory holiday in all jurisdictions except New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island. [2]

As a liturgical festival, Thanksgiving corresponds to the English and continental European Harvest festival, with churches decorated with cornucopias, pumpkins, corn, wheat sheaves, and other harvest bounty, English and European harvest hymns sung on the Sunday of Thanksgiving weekend and scriptural elections drawn from the biblical stories relating to the Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot.

While the actual Thanksgiving holiday is on a Monday, Canadians might eat their Thanksgiving meal on any day of the three day weekend. Thanksgiving is often celebrated with family, it is also often a time for weekend getaways for couples to observe the autumn leaves, spend one last weekend at the cottage, or participate in various outdoor activities such as hiking, fishing, and hunting.

Much like its American counterpart, Canada’s top professional football league, the Canadian Football League, holds a nationally televised doubleheader known as the "Thanksgiving Day Classic." It is one of two weeks in which the league plays on Monday afternoons, the other being the Labour Day Classic. Unlike the Labour Day games, the teams that play on the Thanksgiving Day Classic rotate each year.

The history of Thanksgiving in Canada goes back to an explorer, Martin Frobisher, who had been trying to find a northern passage to the Orient. In the year 1578, he held a formal ceremony, in what is now the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, to give thanks for surviving the long journey. The feast was one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in North America, although celebrating the harvest and giving thanks for a successful bounty of crops had been a long-standing tradition throughout North America by various First Nations and Native American groups. First Nations and Native Americans throughout the Americas, including the Pueblo, Cherokee, Cree and many others organized harvest festivals, ceremonial dances, and other celebrations of thanks for centuries before the arrival of Europeans in North America [3]. Frobisher was later knighted and had an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean in northern Canada named after him — Frobisher Bay.

At the same time, French settlers, having crossed the ocean and arrived in Canada with explorer Samuel de Champlain, also held huge feasts of thanks. They even formed ‘The Order of Good Cheer’ and gladly shared their food with their First Nations neighbours.
After the Seven Years’ War ended in 1763 handing over New France to the British, the citizens of Halifax held a special day of Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving days were observed beginning in 1799 but did not occur every year. After the American Revolution, American refugees who remained loyal to Great Britain moved from the United States and came to Canada. They brought the customs and practices of the American Thanksgiving to Canada. The first Thanksgiving Day after Canadian Confederation was observed as a civic holiday on April 5, 1872 to celebrate the recovery of the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) from a serious illness.

Starting in 1879 Thanksgiving Day was observed every year but the date was proclaimed annually and changed year to year. The theme of the Thanksgiving holiday also changed year to year to reflect an important event to be thankful for. In the early years it was for an abundant harvest and occasionally for a special anniversary.

After World War I, both Armistice Day and Thanksgiving were celebrated on the Monday of the week in which November 11 occurred. Ten years later, in 1931, the two days became separate holidays, and Armistice Day was renamed Remembrance Day.
On January 31, 1957, the Canadian Parliament proclaimed:

A Day of General Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the bountiful harvest with which Canada has been blessed … to be observed on the 2nd Monday in October.[1]

Post processing: Topaz vibrance (HDR), posterization, watercolour, ink outlines, sandstone filter

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